Other cases resolved with prison and community control

Jennifer Mullins

Jennifer D. Mullins, 36, Gallipolis was sentenced to a total of 36 months in prison by Gallia County Common Pleas Judge Margaret Evans after Mullins recently pled guilty to tampering with evidence and failure to appear. She was originally indicted in 2016 for illegal conveyance of drugs onto a detention facility, namely a Clonazepam pill, and then tampering with evidence for trying to conceal the pill on the concrete by dragging her foot over it. In 2017, Mullins was indicted for failure to appear.

According to Prosecuting Attorney Jason Holdren, Mullins was placed on pre-trial services in the original case and absconded supervision. She also committed misdemeanor offenses while the case was pending. Mullins was discovered at Arby’s in Gallipolis by Gallia County Sheriff’s Office Detectives Chris Gruber and Brady Curry. Holdren said when she realized they were law enforcement, she fled. The detectives followed and ultimately captured Mullins and took her into custody.

Mullins pled guilty to the tampering with evidence and failure to appear. The illegal conveyance charge was dismissed. She was sentenced to 24 months in prison for tampering with evidence and 12 months in prison for failure to appear, to be served consecutively, for a total of 36 months.

Joshua Johnson

Joshua S. Johnson, 38, Crown City was sentenced to 11 months in prison by Judge Evans after pleading guilty to possession of heroin and failure to appear. Johnson was originally indicted in 2016 for the possession of .14 grams of heroin. A bill of information was filed on January 10, 2018, by Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Jeremy Fisher charging Johnson with failure to appear. Johnson was sentenced to 11 months for both charges, to be served concurrently.

According to a release from Holdren, also recently sentenced to prison were:

Jordan Merry

Jordan W. Merry, age 24, of Thurman, Ohio, was sentenced to 18 months in prison for his recent convictions of Permitting Drug Abuse, Possession of Heroin, and Failure to Appear.  Upon his release from prison, the Defendant will be placed on community control for two years.  In the event the Defendant fails to comply with the terms of his community control, he could be sentenced to prison for an additional 30 months.

Ahmed Aden

Ahmed O. Aden, age 28, of Columbus, Ohio, was sentenced to 7 months in prison for his recent convictions of Trafficking in Drugs and Failure to Appear.  Upon his release from prison, the Defendant will be placed on community control for three years and be required to successfully complete a Community Based Corrections Facility.  In the event the Defendant fails to comply with the terms of his community control, he could be sentenced to prison for an additional 18 months.

Other cases recently resolved were:

Melissa Thornton

Melissa L. Thornton, 44, Hurricane, W.Va., pled guilty to aggravated possession of drugs, namely 2 ½ Opana tablets, and an amended charge of attempted tampering with evidence and was sentenced to 48 months community control for both charges, to be served concurrently. A prison term of 12 months for aggravated possession of drugs and 18 months for attempted tampering with evidence were reserved, to be served consecutively, should Thornton violate community control.

In addition, Thornton was ordered to enter and successfully complete a Community Based Corrections Facility program, which is a lock-down treatment program, successfully complete a halfway house and report to probation upon completion. She was also ordered to serve 45 days of local jail time or until she was transported to the CBCF.

Jamin Johnson

Jamin D. Johnson, 32, Gallipolis, pled guilty to possession of .34 grams of heroin and was sentenced to 24 months community control. Johnson was originally also indicted for trafficking, which was dismissed. Johnson was sentenced earlier in 2017 to 12 months in prison for failure to appear. According to Holdren, the laboratory test results for the heroin trafficking and possession case were not returned until after Johnson was sentenced to prison. They proceeded to charge Johnson and he subsequently agreed to serve the 24 months community control upon his release from prison. In addition, he was ordered to submit to an evaluation, enter and successfully complete the Gallia County Common Pleas Drug Court upon release from prison, submit to intensive supervision reporting, comply with a substance abuse and mental health evaluation and follow-up treatment, complete 200 hours of community service if not gainfully employed full-time and successfully complete Moral Reconation Training.

“I think this is a very good outcome, given he has been sentenced to prison,” said Holdren. “He will serve time and we have some accountability built into this once he gets out.”

Judy Swim

Judy A. Swim, 56, Vinton pled guilty to breaking and entering and was sentenced to 48 months community control, with a 12-month prison term reserved should she violate community control.

Michelle Myers

Michelle Myers, 43, Gallipolis pled guilty to telecommunications fraud and was sentenced to 48 months community control. The sentence was ordered to be served concurrently with a previous 2017 case, in which Meyers pled guilty to theft and was sentenced to community control and ordered to enter a Community Based Correctional Facility. She later entered Hope House in Gallia County. In addition to the community control sentence, Myers is ordered to remain at Hope House and successfully complete the program, report to probation upon release, submit to an evaluation for, and if appropriate, successfully complete the Gallia County Common Pleas Drug Court, submit to intensive supervision reporting, complete 200 hours of community service, if not gainfully employed full-time, successfully complete Moral Reconation Training and successfully complete 120 days of S.A.M. A prison term of 12 months was reserved should Myers violate her community control.

Holdren said the crime she was charged with in this case was committed prior to her entering a treatment facility.

“At the time of her sentencing, in this case, I’d like to note that she was doing very well in treatment,” said Holdren. “[Judge Evans] even applauded how well she looked and how well she’s doing. And again, my office applauds her efforts in working towards sobriety.”

Randy Ebersbach

Randy B. Ebersbach, 61, Langsville, Ohio, pled guilty to an amended charge of obstructing official business, a misdemeanor of the first degree. Ebersbach was originally indicted and charged with improper handling of a firearm in a motor vehicle in connection with a traffic stop conducted by the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Ebersbach was charged with misdemeanor OVI as a result of that stop. He was also found to have a loaded weapon in the vehicle, for which he possessed a CCW.

Holdren said, upon reviewing the case, and given that Ebersbach possessed a CCW, pled guilty to the OVI in the Gallipolis Municipal Court, had no prior felony record and fully cooperated with the arresting officer, he felt it was appropriate the case be resolved without a felony conviction.

“He did make a mistake, but in my job, I try to look at what some of the underlying issues are in a lot of cases, what the other factors are that we should be considering, as far as history and circumstances of the case, and how cooperative somebody might be with law enforcement,” said Holdren about the reduction of the charge to a misdemeanor. “In this case, that’s the reason we got that resolution.”

 

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